Judicial review of state pension age

It’s been announced that a judicial review will need to take place on state pension ages. Essentially, this is a court proceeding in which the judge considers the lawfulness of a decision or action made by a public body; in this case the Government.

Backto60, along with other campaign groups like Women Against State Pension Inequality (WASPI), are arguing against the perceived inequality and unfair treatment of women born in the 1950s who have experienced changes to their state pension age.

The groups claim that when the 1995 Conservative government's Pension Act included plans to increase the women's state pension age to 65 – the same as men's – the changes were implemented unfairly, with little or no personal notice.

The movements also claimed that the changes were implemented faster than promised via the 2011 Pensions Act and had left women with no time to make alternative plans.

When the State Pension was first introduced in 1948 a 65 year old could expect to spend just 13.5 years in receipt of it, but this figure has been increasing ever since. In 2017, a 65 year old can expect to live for another 22.8 years according to the Office for National Statistics.

Under the current law, State Pension age is due to increase to 68 between 2044 and 2046 but the Government is still keen to bring this timetable forward, meaning the State Pension age would increase to 68 between 2037 and 2039, affecting those born between 6 April 1970 and 5 April 1978.

The review is expected to take place in 2019 and it will be interesting to see what the result of the review is and if any further changes to the state pension age for women will change.

For independent advice please get in touch with one of our financial advisers 0808 144 5557

Visit Website

If you like this article and would like to subscribe to INSPIRED, our FREE monthly newsletter, then please click SUBSCRIBE.

Subscribe